A qualitative study exploring factors that influence enrollment in outpatient cardiac rehabilitation

This study, co-authored by Can-Change members Dr. Codie Rouleau and Dr. Tavis Campbell, explored patients’ decision-making about whether or not to enroll in cardiac rehabilitation (CR), an underutilized program that is associated with significantly improved health outcomes. Themes that emerged included anticipated benefit, perceived ability, and contextual influences. Individualized efforts to resolve ambivalence, address knowledge gaps, and problem-solve barriers may increase uptake into CR programs.

A Qualitative Study Exploring Factors that Influence Enrolment in Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation

Can-Change members C.R. Rouleau and T.S. Campbell were involved in a study exploring patients’ decision-making about enrolling into a cardiac rehabilitation program. Anticipated benefit, perceived ability, and contextual influences were themes that emerged from the face-to-face interviews with patients. Individualized efforts to resolve ambivalence, address knowledge gaps, and problem-solve barriers may increase patients’ uptake of cardiac rehabilitation programs as effective secondary prevention strategy.

Training Healthcare Providers in Motivational Communication: Do We Know What We Are Doing?

Regular physical activity (PA) is essential for secondary and tertiary prevention of cardiometabolic risk factors and disease, but low adherence to PA recommendations is common. Motivational communication (MC) shows promise for promoting PA adherence. However dissemination of MC strategies has been limited. We discuss preliminary considerations for training individuals in the use of MC. Future work is needed to establish what constitutes competent MC training to impact cardiometabolic health outcomes. Can-Change members Dr. Tavis Campbell, Dr. Simon Bacon, Dr. Kim Corace, Dr. Kim L. Lavoie, and Dr. Michael Vallis contributed to this article.

The Comparative Impact of Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery (MBCR) and Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) on Sleep and Mindfulness in Cancer Patients

This study, co-authored by Can-Change members Dr. Codie Rouleau and Dr. Tavis Campbell, is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial comparing mindfulness-based cancer recovery (MBCR) to cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) in cancer patients with insomnia. Changes in dysfunctional sleep beliefs produced by the CBT-I group exceeded those produced by MBCR at post-program and follow-up (P < .001), supporting the use of both CBT-I and MBCR to reduce insomnia severity.