Comment on Pladevall et al’s 2015 publication in The Diabetes Educator

Comment calling attention to the need for health professionals to be trained in motivational interviewing (MI) due to it being a highly complex clinical skill taking considerable time to learn and master and how health professionals trained in MI also require ongoing training and supervision. Can-Change members Dr. Tavis Campbell, Dr. Simon Bacon, Dr. Kim Corace, Dr. Kim L. Lavoie, and Dr. Michael Vallis contributed to this article.

Adherence to Antihypertensive Medications: Current Status and Future Directions

Despite the proven clinical efficacy of antihypertensive medications to control BP, approximately half of treated patients are nonadherent. Barriers to antihypertensive medication adherence are numerous and include patient-related, provider-related, therapy-related, and system-related influences. This review, authored in part by Can-Change members Dr. Kim Lavoie and Dr. Tavis Campbell summarizes the current understanding of the prevalence and impact of the failure to adhere to the medical management of hypertension. Factors linked to improved adherence and studies that assessed strategies to improve adherence are also summarized.

Training Healthcare Providers in Motivational Communication: Do We Know What We Are Doing?

Regular physical activity (PA) is essential for secondary and tertiary prevention of cardiometabolic risk factors and disease, but low adherence to PA recommendations is common. Motivational communication (MC) shows promise for promoting PA adherence. However dissemination of MC strategies has been limited. We discuss preliminary considerations for training individuals in the use of MC. Future work is needed to establish what constitutes competent MC training to impact cardiometabolic health outcomes. Can-Change members Dr. Tavis Campbell, Dr. Simon Bacon, Dr. Kim Corace, Dr. Kim L. Lavoie, and Dr. Michael Vallis contributed to this article.

The Comparative Impact of Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery (MBCR) and Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) on Sleep and Mindfulness in Cancer Patients

This study, co-authored by Can-Change members Dr. Codie Rouleau and Dr. Tavis Campbell, is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial comparing mindfulness-based cancer recovery (MBCR) to cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) in cancer patients with insomnia. Changes in dysfunctional sleep beliefs produced by the CBT-I group exceeded those produced by MBCR at post-program and follow-up (P < .001), supporting the use of both CBT-I and MBCR to reduce insomnia severity.