A qualitative study exploring factors that influence enrollment in outpatient cardiac rehabilitation

This study, co-authored by Can-Change members Dr. Codie Rouleau and Dr. Tavis Campbell, explored patients’ decision-making about whether or not to enroll in cardiac rehabilitation (CR), an underutilized program that is associated with significantly improved health outcomes. Themes that emerged included anticipated benefit, perceived ability, and contextual influences. Individualized efforts to resolve ambivalence, address knowledge gaps, and problem-solve barriers may increase uptake into CR programs.

A Qualitative Study Exploring Factors that Influence Enrolment in Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation

Can-Change members C.R. Rouleau and T.S. Campbell were involved in a study exploring patients’ decision-making about enrolling into a cardiac rehabilitation program. Anticipated benefit, perceived ability, and contextual influences were themes that emerged from the face-to-face interviews with patients. Individualized efforts to resolve ambivalence, address knowledge gaps, and problem-solve barriers may increase patients’ uptake of cardiac rehabilitation programs as effective secondary prevention strategy.

The OPTIMIZE trial: Rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial of motivational enhancement therapy to improve adherence to statin medication

Can-Change members Drs. Kim Lavoie and Tavis Campbell contributed to this manuscript which describes the rational and design of a randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of motivational interviewing (MInt) in improving adherence to statin medication. The primary outcome is change in MPR adherence to statin medication from baseline to 12-months. Secondary outcomes include within-patient change in self-reported medication adherence, stage of change and self-efficacy for medication adherence, motivation to adhere to statin medication, and lipid profile.

Changing Provider Behavior in the Context of Chronic Disease Management: Focus on Clinical Inertia

Despite overwhelming evidence supporting the benefits of using clinical practice guidelines, there is a long history of poor uptake by providers (known as “clinical inertia”). This article reviews evidence for the ubiquity of clinical inertia across a variety of chronic health conditions, as well as the organizational and system, patient, and provider factors that serve to maintain it. Can-Change members Dr. Kim Lavoie and Dr. Tavis Campbell contributed to this article.