In the Media

In keeping with our goal to keep the public abreast of new developments in the field of health behaviour change interventions, the work of Can-Change members is often talked about in the media.

Please note that articles are posted in the language in which they were originally published.


December 19, 2018

Les antidépresseurs, bons pour la tête et le cœur

Une étude observationnelle menée par la Dre Kim Lavoie a montré une forte diminution du risque de troubles cardiaques chez les patients sous antidépresseurs. L’étude avait pour but de favoriser le dépistage systématique des troubles dépressifs chez les personnes avec des troubles en santé cardiaque.
February 16, 2018

Top CRRN Trainee Prize awarded to Can-Change’s Anda Dragomir

Can-Change trainee Anda Dragomir receives top trainee prize at the CRRN's annual meeting for her work on physician training in behaviour change counselling and motivational communication.
September 11, 2017

Symptoms of Anxiety and Heart Disease May Overlap in Women

In this study, anxiety disorders were present in subjects without previously diagnosed heart disease yet they were the ones with more ischemia. This suggests that these women likely HAD heart disease that just hadn’t been diagnosed yet. The reason might have been because their anxiety disorder may have been masking symptoms of heart disease because many of them overlap (e.g., fatigue, decreased energy, heart palpitations, sweating, chest discomfort, hyperventilation, and fear/worry). This could lead physicians to misinterpret symptoms of real heart disease as those of anxiety in women >>> via MedicalResearch.com - February 26, 2016
August 22, 2017

Can-Change members Drs. Kim Lavoie and Simon Bacon speak at the Montreal March for Science

Watch Drs. Kim Lavoie and Simon Bacon speak during the Montreal March for Science held in April 2017 (videos)
July 10, 2017

Can-Change Member Dr. Kim Corace talks about her work as Inspiration Award Recipient

Video interview posted by Royal Talks in March 2015. Dr. Kim Corace demonstrates how research and science inform clinical practice and lead to improved quality of care. >>> via YouTube - March 2015
April 8, 2017

Quand les mauvaises habitudes rendent malade

Les maladies chroniques ont beaucoup de facteurs de risque comportementaux et psychologiques communs, dont le tabagisme, la mauvaise alimentation, l’inactivité physique, la sédentarité, la surconsommation d’alcool et le stress. Extrêmement répandues à l’échelle planétaire, les maladies chroniques sont des affections de longue durée qui évoluent avec le temps. D’après l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS), elles sont responsables du plus haut taux de mortalité dans le monde. >>> via Le Devoir - 8 avril 2017
February 1, 2017

Comment mieux prévenir les maladies chroniques

Entretien (fil audio) avec Dre Kim Lavoie en février 2017 diffusé sur Canal M.
January 16, 2017

In denial: Why do we often ignore medical symptoms, when we know better?

Ignoring symptoms of a disease with a high mortality rate is a surprisingly common phenomenon, says Dr. Kim Lavoie. “People will cognitively avoid things they don’t want to be real; it’s a natural defense mechanism,” she says. Studies have shown the different ways it manifests – from using humour, to outright refusal to acknowledge that an illness might exist. >>> via Chatelaine - January 16, 2017
December 5, 2016

L’UQAM félicite Kim Lavoie sur son élection au Collège de nouveaux chercheurs et créateurs en art et en science de la SRC

Écoutez le court vidéo-reportage avec un entretien avec la Dre Kim Lavoie publié le 5 décembre 2016 >>> via YouTube
March 30, 2016

Apprivoiser sa maladie, avec Kim Lavoie

Facteur de stress considérable, la maladie chronique peut avoir plus d'impact sur l'état psychologique du patient que sur sa santé physique. Scientifique du Centre de recherche de l'Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Kim Lavoie connaît les facteurs de risques et les moyens d'éviter la dépression chronique. Écouter le fil audio. >>> via Radio-Canada.ca - 3 avril 2016
February 23, 2016

Anxiety may influence a woman’s heart during exercise

In women, blood flow to the heart during exercise testing may be influenced by anxiety, while the same does not appear to be true for men, according to results reported in the annual women’s themed issue of Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes. Overall, reduced blood flow – called ischemia – was more common in men than in women, and anxiety disorders weren’t generally linked to higher or lower risk of ischemia. >>> via Reuters - February 23, 2016
February 23, 2016

Anxiety in Women May Mask Heart Disease Symptoms, Researchers Say

Women with an anxiety disorder may have less blood going to their heart when exercising, according to a new study -- and researchers suggest doctors may sometimes miss signs of heart disease in these women. Study author Kim Lavoie says the findings may indicate that anxiety symptoms such as chest discomfort or palpitations -- which can overlap those of heart disease -- may mask heart disease in women. >>> via HealthDay News - February 23, 2016
January 11, 2016

Toronto Rehab program targets people at high risk of getting cancer

The idea behind the 12-week Acceleration Program is to employ the tools of cardiac rehab, primarily education and exercise, before an illness develops, a sort of pre-hab, rather than rehab. It steers away from a didactic, just “do it,” approach, explains behavioural change expert Simon Bacon. Instead, it focuses on participants’ reasons for wanting to change. It emphasizes small achievable goals. “Success breeds success,” says Bacon. >>> via The Toronto Star - January 11, 2016