Our mission

Can-Change is made up of a group of scientific and practice leaders in the design and delivery/dissemination of evidence-based health behaviour change interventions that promote the adoption and maintenance of healthy lifestyles. Read more…

Our programs

Our training programs and workshops target multiple healthcare professionals (physicians, nurses, psychologists, allied health) and trainees, and have covered a range of topics (e.g., motivational communication approaches, adherence interventions, stress management, health behavior change strategies, multidisciplinary medicine). Read more…

Recent posts

November 10, 2020

Psychosocial Care in Diabetes – Podcast series

Medicine Matters diabetes highlights the impact of psychosocial issues on diabetes care in a series of seven podcasts. Key areas being discussed include dealing with diabetes distress, the psychological impact of hypoglycaemia, using diabetes technology, optimal and consistent medication taking, disengagement with diabetes, and the psychosocial impact of COVID-19 in patients with diabetes.

October 23, 2020

Call for Masters, Ph.D. and Postdoc Candidates – MBMC (Montreal)

The Montréal Behavioural Medicine Centre (MBMC), directed by Dr. Simon Bacon (Health, Kinesiology and Applied Physiology, Concordia University) and Dr. Kim Lavoie (Psychology, Université du Québec à Montréal), is welcoming applications for several Masters, Ph.D. and postdoctoral opportunities in the fields of health, e-health, chronic disease management, and behavioural interventions.

August 20, 2020

Rethinking How to Expand the Evidence Base for Health Behavior Change in Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

Can-Change executive members K. Lavoie, S. Bacon and T.S. Campbell are leading a study to examine a tailored, technology-supported intervention aimed at increasing physical activity in healthcare professionals. The study will evaluate if additional theory-based behaviour change techniques used to promote motivation, self-regulation and habit can support increased physical activity participation relative to information alone.