Our mission

Can-Change is made up of a group of scientific and practice leaders in the design and delivery/dissemination of evidence-based health behavior change interventions that promote the adoption and maintenance of healthy lifestyles. Read more…

Our programs

Our training programs and workshops target multiple healthcare professionals (physicians, nurses, psychologists, allied health) and trainees, and have covered a range of topics (e.g., motivational communication approaches, adherence interventions, stress management, health behavior change strategies, multidisciplinary medicine). Read more…

Recent publications

January 17, 2017

In denial: Why do we often ignore medical symptoms, when we know better?

Ignoring symptoms of a disease with a high mortality rate is a surprisingly common phenomenon, says Dr. Kim Lavoie, co-director of the Montreal Behavioural Medicine Centre and a psychology professor at the University of Quebec at Montreal. Studies have shown the different ways it manifests – from using humour, to outright refusal to acknowledge that an illness might exist.

November 4, 2016

Behaviour-change intervention in a multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled COPD study: methodological considerations and implementation

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is generally progressive and associated with reduced physical activity. Both pharmacological therapy and exercise training are often not sufficient to change the amount of daily physical activity a patient undertakes. Behaviour-change self-management programmes are designed to address this, including setting motivational goals and providing social support. We present and discuss the necessary methodological considerations when integrating behaviour-change interventions into a multicentre study.

November 4, 2016

The OPTIMIZE trial: Rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial of motivational enhancement therapy to improve adherence to statin medication

This manuscript describes the rational and design of a randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of motivational interviewing (MInt) in improving adherence to statin medication. The primary outcome is change in MPR adherence to statin medication from baseline to 12-months. Secondary outcomes include within-patient change in self-reported medication adherence, stage of change and self-efficacy for medication adherence, motivation to adhere to statin medication, and lipid profile.